Old Testament

10

“And I will pour out on the house of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem a spirit of grace and supplication. They will look on me, the one they have pierced, and they will mourn for him as one mourns for an only child, and grieve bitterly for him as one grieves for a firstborn son.

Septuagint

10

And I will pour upon the house of David, and upon the inhabitants of Jerusalem, the spirit of grace and compassion: and they shall look upon me, because they have mocked me, and they shall make lamentation for him, as for a beloved friend, and they shall grieve intensely, as for a firstborn son.

Tanakh

10

But I will fill the House of David and the inhabitants of Jerusalem with a spirit of pity and compassion; and they shall lament to Me about those who are slain, wailing over them as over a favorite son and showing bitter grief as over a first-born.

There are two words I am looking at here. The first is pierced in the OT (mocked or slain in the other two). The second is pour out in the OT (pour upon or fill in the other two).

The word translated as pierced by the Old Testament is daqar (Strong’s Concordance #1856, דָּקַר). It occurs 11 times in the Old Testament and Tanakh, and I was only able to find 10 of the occurrences in the Septuagint. Here is how it is translated in each verse…

Verse
Numbers 25:8
Judges 9:54
1 Samuel 31:4
1 Chronicles 10:4
Isaiah 13:15
Jeremiah 37:10
Jeremiah 51:4
Lamentations 4:9
Zechariah 12:10
Zechariah 13:3

Old Testament
Pierced
Through (thrust him through)
Through (thrust me through)
Thrust through
Wounded
Wouned

Pierced
Pierced
Pierce

Septuagint
Pierced
Through (thrust him through)
Pierce
Pierce
Overcome

Pierced
Pierced
Mocked
Bind

Tanakh
Stabbed
Stabbed
Through (run me through)
Pierced through
Wounded
Pierced Through
Wounded
Slain
Put him to death

It seems to me that pierced or thrust through is a good translation for the verse.

The next term is “pour out. Per the Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew and English Lexicon, the Hebrew word, שָׁפַךְ means to, “to spill forth (blood, a libation, liquid metal; or even a solid, that is, to mound up); also (figuratively) to expend (life, soul, complaint, money, etc.); intensively to sprawl out:—cast (up), gush out, pour (out), shed (-der, out), slip.”
The Old Testament version of this verse translates this as to pour out, and the Tanakh version translates it as filling (pouring into a mold, like pouring water into a glass). Since this verse occurs so many times, I did not look up the Septuagint meaning, just the Tanakh meaning.
I looked up the Hebrew word in Strong’s Concordance, and looked at every occurrence of this word in the Tanakh. This Hebrew word occurs 115 times and was translated the following ways by the Jewish scholars who translated the Tanakh from Hebrew to English:
Pile up (Eight times including this verse)
Murder (Once)
Brazen Effrontery (Once)
Puts so many innocent people to death (Once)
Led off course (Once)
Lavished (Once)
Overflowing (Twice)
The remaining 100 times it was translated as one of the following, all which in some way mean pouring or spilling…
Dumped, shed, poured, poured it out, spilled, spill out, runs out, ebbs away, melts.
Which version translated this word correctly… The Tanakh, which translated this word as it had been used (at most) 15 other times, or the Old Testament, which translated the word as it had been used in the Tanakh (at least) 100 other times?
To summarize, the Septuagint agrees more closely with the Old Testament translation, and the Tanakh translates this word into a form that is only used 14 other places rather than the way it translates it 100 times. I think it is fair to say that the Christian and Septuagint translations are probably more accurate.

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